American Lumber

American Lumber

WoodLand American Lumber: Flooring & Interiors

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White Ash

  • Common Name(s): White Ash, American White Ash
  • Distribution: Eastern North America
  • Tree Size: 65-100 ft (20-30 m) tall, 2-5 ft (.6-1.5 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 42 lbs/ft3 (675 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .55, .67
  • Janka Hardness: 1,320 lbf (5,870 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 15,000 lbf/in2 (103.5 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,740,000 lbf/in2 (12.00 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 7,410 lbf/in2 (51.1 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 4.9%, Tangential: 7.8%, Volumetric: 13.3%, T/R Ratio: 1.6
  • Color/Appearance: The heartwood is a light brown color, though darker shades can also be seen, which is sometimes sold as Olive Ash.
  • Color/Appearance: Sapwood can be very wide, and tends to be beige or light brown; not always clearly or sharply demarcated from heartwood.
  • Grain/Texture: Has a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is almost always straight and regular, though sometimes moderately curly or figured boards can be found.
  • Rot Resistance: Heartwood is rated as perishable, or only slightly durable in regard to decay. Ash is also not resistant to insect attack.
  • Workability: Produces good results with hand or machine tools. Responds well to steam bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.
  • Odor: Can have a distinct, moderately unpleasant smell when being worked.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Ash in the Fraxinus genus has been reported to cause skin irritation, and a decrease in lung function.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles.

Red Oak

  • Common Name(s): Red Oak
  • Distribution: Northeastern United States and Southeastern Canada
  • Tree Size: 80-115 ft (25-35 m) tall, 3-6 ft (1-2 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 45 lbs/ft3 (725 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .56, .73
  • Janka Hardness: 1,290 lbf (5,700 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 14,300 lbf/in2 (98.6 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,820,000 lbf/in2 (12.50 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 6,760 lbf/in2 (46.6 MPa)
  • Rot Resistance: Falls somewhere between slightly durable to non-durable. Red Oaks do not have the level of decay and rot resistance that White Oaks possess.
  • Workability: Produces good results with hand and machine tools. Responds well to steam-bending. Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.
  • Odor: Has a tell-tale smell that is common to most oaks. Most find it appealing.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, oak has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include eye and skin irritation.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, and veneer.

White Oak

  • Distribution: Eastern United States
  • Tree Size: 65-85 ft (20-25 m) tall, 3-4 ft (1-1.2 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 50 lbs/ft3 (805 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .60, .81
  • Janka Hardness: 1,360 lbf (6,000 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 15,200 lbf/in2 (104.8 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,780,000 lbf/in2 (12.30 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 7,440 lbf/in2 (51.3 MPa)
  • Shrinkage:Radial: 5.6%, Tangential: 10.5%, Volumetric: 16.3%, T/R Ratio: 1.9
  • Color/Appearance: Has a light to medium brown color, though there can be a fair amount of variation in color.
  • Color/Appearance: Red Oak tends to be slightly redder, but is by no means a reliable method of determining the type of oak.
  • Grain/Texture: Has medium-to-large pores and a fairly coarse grain.
  • Rot Resistance: Good rot resistance: frequently used in boat-building applications.
  • Workability: Produces good results with hand and machine tools. Responds well to steam-bending. Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.
  • Odor: Has a tell-tale smell that is common to most oaks. Most find it appealing.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, oak has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include eye and skin irritation.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, boatbuilding, barrels, and veneer.

Sycamore

  • Common Name(s): Sycamore, American Plane
  • Distribution: Eastern United States
  • Tree Size: 120 ft (37 m) tall, 3 ft (1 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 37 lbs/ft3 (600 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .46, .60
  • Janka Hardness: 770 lbf (3,430 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 10,000 lbf/in2 (69.0 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,420,000 lbf/in2 (9.79 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 5,380 lbf/in2 (37.1 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 5.0%, Tangential: 8.4%, Volumetric: 14.1%, T/R Ratio: 1.7
  • Color/Appearance: Similar to maple, the wood of Sycamore trees is predominantly comprised of the sapwood, with some darker heartwood streaks also found in most boards.
  • Color/Appearance: Though it is not uncommon to also see entire boards of heartwood too.) The sapwood is white to light tan, while the heartwood is a darker reddish brown.
  • Grain/Texture: Sycamore has a fine and even texture that is very similar to maple. The grain is interlocked.
  • Rot Resistance: Sycamore is rated as non-durable to perishable regarding decay resistance, and is susceptible to insect attack.
  • Workability: Overall, Sycamore works easily with both hand and machine tools, though the interlocked grain can be troublesome in surfacing and machining operations at times.
  • Sycamore turns, glues, and finishes well. Responds poorly to steam bending
  • Odor: No characteristic odor.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: There has been no adverse health effects associated with Sycamore.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, interior trim, pallets/crates, flooring, furniture, particleboard, pulpwood, paper-making, tool handles, and other turned objects.

American Walnut

  • Common Name(s): Black Walnut
  • Distribution: Eastern United States
  • Tree Size: 120 ft (37 m) tall, 3 ft (1 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 41 lbs/ft3 (655 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .51, .66
  • Janka Hardness: 1,010 lbf (4,490 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 14,600 lbf/in2 (100.7 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,680,000 lbf/in2 (11.59 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 7,580 lbf/in2 (52.3 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 5.5%, Tangential: 7.8%, Volumetric: 12.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.4
  • Color/Appearance: Heartwood can range from a lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. Color can sometimes have a grey, purple, or reddish cast.
  • Color/Appearance: Sapwood is pale yellow-gray to nearly white. Figured grain patterns such as curl, crotch, and burl are also seen.
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is usually straight, but can be irregular. Has a medium texture and moderate natural luster.
  • Rot Resistance: Black Walnut is rated as very durable in terms of decay resistance, though it is susceptible to insect attack.
  • Workability: Typically easy to work provided the grain is straight and regular. Planer tearout can sometimes be a problem when surfacing pieces with irregular or figured grain.
  • Workability: Glues, stains, and finishes well, (though walnut is rarely stained). Responds well to steam bending.
  • Odor: Black Walnut has a faint, mild odor when being worked.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Black Walnut has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include eye and skin irritation.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Furniture, cabinets, gunstocks, interior paneling, veneer, turned items, and other small wooden objects and novelties.

Ziricote

  • Distribution: Central America and Mexico
  • Tree Size: 30-65 ft (10-20 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 50 lbs/ft3 (805 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .65, .81
  • Janka Hardness: 1,970 lbf (8,780 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 16,400 lbf/in2 (113.1 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,585,000 lbf/in2 (10.93 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 9,270 lbf/in2 (63.9 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 3.5%, Tangential: 6.7%, Volumetric: 9.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.9
  • Color/Appearance: Color ranges from medium to dark brown, sometimes with either a green or purple hue, with darker bands of black growth rings intermixed.
  • Color/Appearance: Ziricote has a very unique appearance, which is sometimes referred to as “spider-webbing” or “landscape” grain figure.
  • Color/Appearance: Quartersawn surfaces can also have ray flakes similar in appearance to those found on quartersawn Hard Maple.
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is straight to slightly interlocked. Medium to fine texture, with good natural luster.
  • Rot Resistance: Ziricote is reported to be naturally resistant to decay.
  • Workability: Overall, Ziricote is fairly easy to work considering its high density.
  • Workability: The wood tends to develop end and surface checks during drying, which can be problematic: though the wood is stable once dry.
  • pieces are usually available in narrow boards or turning squares, with sapwood being very common. Ziricote turns and finishes well, and in most instances, it can also be glued with no problems.
  • Odor: Ziricote has a mild, characteristic scent while being worked, somewhat similar to the smell of Pau Ferro.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Ziricote has been shown to cause cross reactions once an allergic sensitivity to certain woods has been developed.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Woods that can cause initial sensitivity include: Pau Ferro, Macassar Ebony, Cocobolo, and most rosewoods.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Furniture, veneer, cabinetry, gunstocks, musical instruments (acoustic and electric guitars), turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

Western Red Cedar

  • Common Name(s): Western Red cedar, Western Red Cedar
  • Distribution: Pacific Northwest United States/Canada
  • Tree Size: 180 ft (55 m) tall, 10 ft (3 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 23 lbs/ft3 (375 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .31, .37
  • Janka Hardness: 350 lbf (1,560 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 7,500 lbf/in2 (51.7 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,110,000 lbf/in2 (7.66 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 4,560 lbf/in2 (31.4 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 2.4%, Tangential: 5.0%, Volumetric: 6.8%, T/R Ratio: 2.1
  • Color/Appearance: Western Red cedar is typically reddish to pinkish brown, often with random streaks and bands of darker red/brown areas.
  • Grain/Texture: Has a straight grain and a medium to coarse texture.
  • Rot Resistance: Western Redcedar has been rated as durable to very durable in regard to decay resistance, though it is not resistant to insect attack.
  • Workability: Easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though it dents and scratches very easily due to its softness. Glues and finishes well.
  • Workability: As is the case with most softwoods with closed pores, even staining can be a challenge.as is the case with most softwoods with closed pores, even staining can be a challenge.
  • Odor: Western Redcedar has a strong, aromatic scent when being worked.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Western Redcedar has been reported as a sensitizer.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: . Usually most common reactions simply include eye, skin, and respiratory irritation.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, and is reported by the IUCN as being a species of least concern.
  • Common Uses: Shingles, exterior siding and lumber, boat-building, boxes, crates, and musical instruments.

Hard Maple

  • Common Name(s): Hard Maple, Sugar Maple, Rock Maple
  • Scientific Name: Acer saccharum
  • Distribution: Northeastern North America
  • Tree Size: 80-115 ft (25-35 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 44 lbs/ft3 (705 kg/m3)
  • Janka Hardness: 1,450 lbf (6,450 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 15,800 lbf/in2 (109.0 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,830,000 lbf/in2 (12.62 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 7,830 lbf/in2 (54.0 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 4.8%, Tangential: 9.9%, Volumetric: 14.7%, T/R Ratio: 2.1
  • Color/Appearance: Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of Hard Maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood.
  • Sapwood color ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. The heartwood tends to be a darker reddish brown.
  • Birdseye Maple is a figure found most commonly in Hard Maple, though it’s also found less frequently in other species. Hard Maple can also be seen with curly or quilted grain patterns.
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.
  • Workability: Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to Hard Maple’s higher density.
  • Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router.
  • Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.
  • Odor: No characteristic odor.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Hard Maple, along with other maples in the Acer genus have been reported to cause skin irritation, runny nose, and asthma-like respiratory effects.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Flooring (from basketball courts and dance-floors to bowling alleys and residential),
  • veneer, paper (pulpwood), musical instruments, cutting boards, butcher blocks, workbenches, baseball bats, and other turned objects and specialty wood items.

Cherry

  • Common Name(s): Tiete Rosewood, Patagonian Cherry, Sirari
  • Scientific Name: Guibourtia hymenaeifolia (syn. G. chodatiana)
  • Distribution: South America
  • Tree Size: 130-165 ft (40-50 m) tall,3-6 ft (1-2 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 59 lbs/ft3 (945 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .76, .94
  • Janka Hardness: 2,790 lbf (12,410 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 15,830 lbf/in2 (109.2 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 2,030,000 lbf/in2 (14.00 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: No data available
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 4.0%, Tangential: 7.0%, Volumetric: 9.7%, T/R Ratio: 1.8
  • Color/Appearance: Generally an orange to pinkish brown. Color tends to darken and redden with age.
  • Grain is typically straight with bland patterning, exhibiting a very uniform color and appearance.
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is straight, with a medium to fine uniform texture.
  • Rot Resistance: No specific data is available on the decay resistance of Tiete Rosewood,
  • Tests have shown that untreated wood used in exterior applications has a tendency to warp and check.
  • Workability: Tiete Rosewood is hard and dense, making it more difficult to work than lighter woods, but its straight and uniform grain give it a reasonable workability
  • Wood species in the Guibourtia genus tend to contain silica that can prematurely dull cutters
  • Odor: Has a mild scent while being worked.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: There have been no adverse health effects associated with Tiete Rosewood.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Interior flooring, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

Red Alder

  • Common Name(s): Red Alder, Western Red Alder
  • Scientific Name: Alnus rubra
  • Distribution: Coastal western North America
  • Tree Size: 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 30 lbs/ft3 (475 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .37, .47
  • Janka Hardness: 590 lbf (2,620 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 9,800 lbf/in2 (67.6 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,380,000 lbf/in2 (9.52 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 5,820 lbf/in2 (40.1 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 4.4%, Tangential: 7.3%, Volumetric: 12.6%, T/R Ratio: 1.7
  • Color/Appearance: Red Alder tends to be a light tan to reddish brown; color darkens and reddens with age. There is no visible distinction between heartwood and sapwood.
  • The overall grain pattern and appearance is similar to Birch (Betula genus)—though redder than Birch—and both genera are derived from the same family, Betulaceae
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight, with a moderately fine, uniform texture.
  • Rot Resistance: Red Alder is rated non-durable to perishable regarding decay resistance.
  • Freshly cut logs should be quickly converted into lumber and dried to prevent staining or decay in the wood
  • Workability: Red Alder is very easy to work with both hand and machine tools; it sands especially easy.
  • The wood is rather soft, however, and care must be taken to avoid denting it in some applications.
  • Red Alder has excellent gluing, staining, and finishing properties; it also turns well and behaves similar to Black Cherry.
  • Odor: No characteristic odor.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Alder in the Alnus genus has been reported to cause eye, skin, and respiratory irritation.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, millwork, pallets, musical instruments (electric guitar bodies), and chip/pulp wood.

Basswood

  • Common Name(s): Basswood, American Basswood, Lime, Linden
  • Scientific Name: Tilia americana
  • Distribution: Eastern North America
  • Tree Size: 120 ft (37 m) tall, 5 ft (1.5 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 27 lbs/ft3 (425 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .32, .43
  • Janka Hardness: 410 lbf (1,824 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 8,700 lbf/in2 (60.0 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,460,000 lbf/in2 (10.07 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 4,730 lbf/in2 (32.6 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 6.6%, Tangential: 9.3%, Volumetric: 15.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.4
  • Color/Appearance: Pale white to cream color, with only subtle growth rings. The color is mostly uniform throughout the surface of the wood.
  • Grain/Texture: Has a fine and even texture, which is preferred for wood carvers.
  • Rot Resistance: Basswood is rated as being non-durable in regard to heartwood decay.
  • Workability: Easy to work, being very soft and light. Perhaps one of the most suitable wood species for hand carving. Basswood also glues and finishes well. Responds poorly to steam bending.
  • Odor: No characteristic odor.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: There have been no adverse health effects associated with Basswood.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Carvings, lumber, veneer, plywood, and wood pulp and fiber products.

Birch

  • Common Name(s): Yellow Birch
  • Scientific Name: Betula alleghaniensis
  • Distribution: Northeastern North America
  • Tree Size: 65-100 ft (20-30 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 46 lbs/ft3 (740 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .55, .74
  • Janka Hardness: 1,260 lbf (5,610 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 16,600 lbf/in2 (114.5 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 2,010,000 lbf/in2 (13.86 GPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 7.3%, Tangential: 9.5%, Volumetric: 16.8%, T/R Ratio: 1.3
  • Crushing Strength: 8,170 lbf/in2 (56.3 MPa)
  • Color/Appearance: Heartwood tends to be a light reddish brown, with nearly white sapwood. Occasionally figured pieces are available with a wide, shallow curl similar to the curl found in Cherry
  • There is virtually no color distinction between annual growth rings, giving Birch a somewhat dull, uniform appearance.
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is generally straight or slightly wavy, with a fine, even texture. Low natural luster.
  • Rot Resistance: Birch is perishable, and will readily rot and decay if exposed to the elements. The wood is also susceptible to insect attack.
  • Workability: Generally easy to work with hand and machine tools, though boards with wild grain can cause grain tearout during machining operations. Turns, glues, and finishes well.
  • Odor: No characteristic odor.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Birch in the Betula genus has been reported as a sensitizer. Usually most common reactions simply include skin and respiratory irritation.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Plywood, boxes, crates, turned objects, interior trim, and other small specialty wood items.

White Walnut

  • Common Name(s): Butternut, White Walnut
  • Scientific Name: Juglans cinerea
  • Distribution: Eastern United States
  • Tree Size: 100 ft (30 m) tall, 3 ft (1 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 29 lbs/ft3 (460 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .36, .46
  • Janka Hardness: 490 lbf (2,180 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 8,100 lbf/in2 (55.9 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,180,000 lbf/in2 (8.14 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 5,110 lbf/in2 (35.2 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 3.4%, Tangential: 6.4%, Volumetric: 10.6%, T/R Ratio: 1.9
  • Color/Appearance: Heartwood is usually a light to medium tan, sometimes with a reddish tint.
  • Growth rings are darker and form fairly distinct grain patterns. Sapwood is a pale yellowish white.
  • Grain/Texture: Grain is typically straight, with a medium to coarse texture. Silky natural luster.
  • Rot Resistance: Decay resistance is rated as moderately durable to non-durable.; also susceptible to insect attack.
  • Workability: Butternut is easily worked with both hand and machine tools. However, being so soft, Butternut has a tendency to leave some fuzzy surfaces after planing or sanding.
  • Sharp cutters and fine-grit sandpaper is recommended. Butternut glues, stains, and finishes well.
  • Odor: Butternut has virtually no scent or odor when being worked.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: There have been no adverse health effects associated with Butternut.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
  • Common Uses: Veneer, carving, furniture, interior trim, boxes, and crates.

Cerejeira

  • Origin: Evergreen forests of South America
  • Color: Sapwood and heartwood are yellowish brown
  • Characteristics: Similar to oak, but without wide wood rays
  • Application: Furniture, interior finishing and packaging

Elm, red

  • Origin: U.S. and Canada
  • Color: Dark brown with a reddish tinge
  • Application: Replaces the European Elm, which is becoming ever rarer, and is used for sliced veneer in the European region, and in America also for building ships and shipyards.

Satin Walnut

  • Origin of Wood Type: Eastern USA
  • Other Trade Names: American Red Gum, Gum, Sweet Gum, Sap Gum, Hazel Pine
  • Description: Satin Walnut is quartered sawn curly sweet gum. This specie needs to be quartered due its nervous disposition. It is used for high end veneers and lumber.
  • Wood Uses: Furniture, Doors, Hardwood Flooring, Trim, Plywood, Boxes, Crates, Panels, Baskets and many other uses!
  • Color Range: Cream- White- Red- Brown

Douglas Fir

  • Origin: North America, Europe (especially Germany)
  • Color: The heartwood is colored a fresh yellowish brown to reddish yellow – although it quickly darkens when exposed to light, becoming brown to dark red.
  • Characteristics: Largely straight fibers with a medium fine and uniform texture. Depending on how it is cut, it has a marked crown-cut pattern or stripes.
  • Application: The modern veneer per se; owing to its frequently distinct crown-cut and striped pattern, it is particularly good for decorative interior finishing.
  • Such as wall and ceiling paneling, stairway steps and banisters, doors and furniture making.
  • Construction wood for outdoor buildings, docks and harbor facilities, shipbuilding and railroad crossties. Light, bright, friendly, modern

Pine

  • Common Name(s): Virginia Pine, Scrub Pine
  • Scientific Name: Pinus virginiana
  • Distribution: Eastern United States
  • Tree Size: 50-65 ft (15-20 m) tall, 1-2 ft (.3-.6 m) trunk diameter
  • Average Dried Weight: 32 lbs/ft3 (515 kg/m3)
  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .45, .51
  • Janka Hardness: 740 lbf (3,290 N)
  • Modulus of Rupture: 13,000 lbf/in2 (89.7 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,520,000 lbf/in2 (10.48 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 6,710 lbf/in2 (46.3 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 4.2%, Tangential: 7.2%, Volumetric: 11.9%, T/R Ratio: 1.7
  • Color/Appearance: Heartwood is reddish brown, wide sapwood is yellowish white.
  • Grain/Texture: Straight grained with a medium texture.
  • Rot Resistance: The heartwood is rated as moderate to low in decay resistance.
  • Workability: Overall, Virginia Pine works fairly well with most tools, though the resin can gum up tools and clog sandpaper. Virginia Pine glues and finishes well.
  • Odor: Has a distinct smell that is shared among most species in the Pinus genus.
  • Allergies/Toxicity: Working with pine has been reported to cause allergic skin reactions and/or asthma-like symptoms in some people.
  • Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, and is reported by the IUCN as being a species of least concern.
  • Common Uses: Southern Yellow Pine is used for heavy construction, such as: bridges, beams, poles, railroad ties, etc. It’s also used for making plywood, wood pulp, and veneers.
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